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Helpline: 9233355555
Appointment: 0343-6620200
Emergency: 9800881600
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What is Oncology?
Oncology is a branch of Medicine which deals with diagnosis, investigation, staging, treatment & follow-up of Cancer.

The Cancer Conundrum:
Cancer is becoming a modern day epidemic. The incidence of cancer in India is 70-90 per 100,000 population & cancer prevalence is established to be around 25,00,000  with over 8,00,000 new cases and 5,50,000 deaths occurring each year. More than 70% of the cases present in advanced stage. About 6% of all deaths in India are due to cancers.
 
Lack of well-equipped cancer treatment centers and severe shortage of trained cancer specialists compounds the problem.
 
Comprehensive Cancer Care: 
The Department of Clinical Oncology, The Mission Hospital has been developed to provide state-of-the-art management for all types of cancer .Comprehensive cancer care encompasses all facilities including screening, diagnosis, staging, treatment & follow-up of a cancer patient.

What we offer: 
Screening & Prevention: Asymptomatic high risk patients are screened as per standard international guidelines for early detection and prevention of cancer through counseling, relevant investigations, clinical examination and lifestyle modification.
 
Diagnosis: Clinical examination, Biopsy, Tumor marker profile, Mammography, CT, MRI, USG, other relevant investigations.
 
Treatment: Multimodality multispecialty treatment services incorporating specialized Cancer Surgery, Clinical Oncology, Hemato-Oncology services through Team Approach.
 
Follow-up: Clinical examination, Tumor Markers, USG, CT, MRI,Mammography, other relevant investigations.
 
Brief Discussion on Common Cancers   
 
BREAST CANCER
Worldwide, breast cancer is the most common invasive cancer in women. Breast cancer comprises 22.9% of invasive cancers in women and 16% of all female cancers. 13.7% of cancer deaths in women and 6.0% of all cancer deaths for men and women together for breast cancer. Breast cancer screening refers to testing otherwise-healthy women for breast cancer in an attempt to achieve an earlier diagnosis under the assumption that early detection will improve outcomes. A number of screening tests have been employed including: clinical and self breast examsmammography, genetic screening, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging etc. The primary risk factors for breast cancer are female sex and older age. Other potential risk factors include: genetics, lack of childbearing or lack of breastfeeding, higher levels of certain hormones, certain dietary patterns, and obesity. Recent studies have indicated that exposure to light pollution is a risk factor for the development of breast cancer. For the average woman, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends mammography every two years in women between the ages of 50 and 74. The first noticeable symptom of breast cancer is typically a lump that feels different from the rest of the breast tissue. More than 80% of breast cancer cases are discovered when the woman feels a lump. The earliest breast cancers are detected by a mammogram. Lumps found in lymph nodes located in the armpits can also indicate breast cancer. The management of breast cancer depends on various factors, including the stage of the cancer and the age of the patient. Generally required combined mode of treatment includes surgery/ chemotherapy/ radiotherapy.
ORAL CANCER
Oral cancer is the most common form of cancer in India. 130,000 people succumb to oral cancer in India annually. The reason for this high prevalence of oral cancer in India is primarily tobacco consumed in the form of gutka, quid, snuff or misri. 75 percent of oral cancers are linked to modifiable behaviors such as tobacco use and excessive alcohol consumption. Other factors include poor oral hygiene, irritation caused by ill-fitting dentures and other rough surfaces on the teeth, poor nutrition, and some chronic infections caused by bacteria or viruses. If oral cancer is diagnosed in its earliest stages, treatment is generally very effective. Chewing betelpaan and Areca is known to be a strong risk factor for developing oral cancer. In India where such practices are common, oral cancer represents up to 40% of all cancers. Oral cancer often presents as a non-healing ulcer (shows no sign of healing after 2 weeks). Men are affected twice as often as women. Surgical excision (removal) of the tumor is usually recommended if the tumor is small enough, and if surgery is likely to result in a functionally satisfactory result. Radiation therapy with or without chemotherapy is often used in conjunction with surgery, or as the definitive radical treatment, especially if the tumour is inoperable.
LUNG CANCER
Worldwide, lung cancer is the most common cancer among men in terms of both incidence and mortality, and among women has the third highest incidence, and is second after breast cancer in mortality. The main primary types are small-cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) and non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). The most common symptoms are coughing (including coughing up blood), weight loss, shortness of breath, and chest pains. The vast majority (80–90%) of cases of lung cancer are due to long-term exposure to tobacco smoke. About 10–15% of cases occur in people who have never smoked. These cases are often caused by a combination of genetic factors and exposure to radon gas,  asbestos,  or other forms of air pollution,  including second-hand smoke.  Lung cancer may be seen on chest radiographs and computed tomography (CT) scans. The diagnosis is confirmed by biopsy which is usually performed by bronchoscopy or CT-guidance. Treatment and long-term outcomes depend on the type of cancer, the stage (degree of spread), and the person's overall health, measured by performance status. Common treatments include surgerychemotherapy, and radiotherapy.
COLORECTAL CANCER
As of 2012[update], it is the second most common cause of cancer in women (9.2% of diagnoses) and the third most common in men (10.0%) with it being the fourth most common cause of cancer death after lungstomach, and liver cancer. Signs and symptoms may include blood in the stool, a change in bowel movements, weight loss, and feeling tired all the time. Risk factors for colorectal cancer include lifestyle, older age, and inherited genetic disorders. Other risk factors include diet, smokingalcohol, lack of physical activity, family history of colon cancer and colon polyps, presence of colon polyps, race, exposure to radiation, and even other diseases such as diabetes and obesity. Bowel cancer may be diagnosed by obtaining a sample of the colon during a sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy. This is then followed by medical imaging (CT scan) to determine if the disease has spread. Screening is effective for preventing and decreasing deaths from colorectal cancer. Screening is recommended starting from the age of 50 to 75 yrs. Treatments used for colorectal cancer may include some combination of surgery, radiation therapychemotherapy and targeted therapy.
CERVICAL CANCER
Worldwide, cervical cancer is both the fourth-most common cause of cancer and deaths from cancer in women.  In 2012, 528,000 cases of cervical cancer were estimated to have occurred, with 266,000 deaths.  It is the second-most common cause of female-specific cancer after breast cancer, accounting for around 8% of both total cancer cases and total cancer deaths in women.  About 80% of cervical cancers occur in developing countries. Early on, typically no symptoms are seen. Later symptoms may include abnormal vaginal bleedingpelvic pain, or pain during sexual intercourseHuman papillomavirus (HPV) infection appears to be involved in the development of more than 90% of cases; most people who have had HPV infections, however, do not develop cervical cancer. Other risk factors include smoking, a weak immune systembirth control pills, starting sex at a young age, and having many sexual partners, but these are less important. Cervical cancer typically develops from precancerous changes over 10 to 20 years. HPV vaccines protect against between two and seven high-risk strains of this family of viruses and may prevent up to 90% of cervical cancers. Cervical cancer screening using the Pap smear or acetic acid can identify precancerous changes which when treated can prevent the development of cancer. Treatment of cervical cancer may consist of some combination of surgerychemotherapy, and radiotherapyFive year survival rates in the United States are 68%.Outcomes however depend very much on how early the cancer is detected.

Central Pancreatectomy for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

Central Pancreatectomy for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

Central Pancreatectomy for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

Laparoscopic Radial Hysterectomy with Bilateral Pelvic Lymph Node Dissection for Endrometrial Carcinoma

Central Pancreatectomy for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

Breast Conservative Surgery with LD flap reconstruction for Carcinoma breast

Central Pancreatectomy for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

Laparoscopic Anterior Resection for Rectal Cancer

Central Pancreatectomy for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

30cm Malignant ovarian tumor

Primary Debulking Surgery

Central Pancreatectomy for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

Atypical presentation of Lupus Vulgaris

Central Pancreatectomy for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

Interval debulking surgery for carcinoma ovary

Central Pancreatectomy for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

Radical Orchidectomy with Hemiscrotectomy for Cord Liposarcoma

VATS right upper lobe wedge resection

Central Pancreatectomy for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

 

Central Pancreatectomy for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

Breast Sarcoma

Central Pancreatectomy for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

 

Central Pancreatectomy for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

WLE Plus LD Flap Closure

Central Pancreatectomy for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

Scalp Basal Cell Carcinoma - WLE + O-Z Plasty

Central Pancreatectomy for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

Inguinal Lymph node dissection with sartorius flap coverage

Central Pancreatectomy for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

Excision of Bladder Peritoneum in full Bladder method

Central Pancreatectomy for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

External iliac vessel with Ureter medially

Central Pancreatectomy for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma
Central Pancreatectomy for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma
Central Pancreatectomy for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

Wide local excision plus LD flap reconstruction for squamous cell carcinoma in back

Central Pancreatectomy for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

Total Thyroidectomy

Central Pancreatectomy for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

WLE + PMMC Coverage

Central Pancreatectomy for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

 

Central Pancreatectomy for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

 

Central Pancreatectomy for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

 

Central Pancreatectomy for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

 

Central Pancreatectomy for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

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Contact Details
The Mission Hospital
Immon Kalyan Sarani,
Sector IIC Bidhan Nagar,
Durgapur - 713212, Burdwan, West Bengal
Mobile : +91-9233355555
Phone No.: 0343-2535555/2535544